M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Alles was nicht in eine der anderen Kategorien passt.
Antworten
Benutzeravatar
Arry
Hero Member
Hero Member
Beiträge: 1353
Registriert: 15.04.2012, 21:26

M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Arry » 15.12.2012, 14:45

Liebe Däumlinge,

es ist ein weiteres Buch erschienen, das zumindest teilweise traditionelles Bogenschießen mit Daumentechnik behandelt: M Khorasani "Persian Archery and Swordsmanship". Sieht sehr umfassend und reich bebildert aus - ist mit 120 Euro Grundpreis plus 7% Mehrwertsteuer plus 7 Euro Versand aber auch heftig teuer... Sollte sich jemand trotzdem dieses Buch gönnen, wäre es toll, wenn er hier kurz berichten könnte, ob sich die Ausgabe lohnt!

Grüße
Arry

http://www.moshtaghkhorasani.com/biography/books/persian-archery-and-swordsmanship/
http://www.moshtaghkhorasani.com/publishing/gallery-1-persian-archery-and-swordsmanship/

The book Persian Archery and Swordsmanship: Historical Martial Arts of Iran is a reference manual on the historical Iranian martial arts in application. The martial arts have influenced all aspects of the ten thousand year history, language and culture of the Iranian people, and remain to this day integral to the Iranian national identity as clearly demonstrated in the Persian epic the Book of Kings. A unique martial culture has permeated all of the most important artifacts of ancient (bronze- and iron age Luristan and Marlik sites), classical (Achemenid, Parthian and Sassanids), medieval (Samanids) and early modern and modern Iran (Safavid, Afsharid, Zand and Qajar periods), in its art and archaeology, literature, physical culture and national outlook. It is, without doubt, a martial tradition whose lineage extends back in time to the ancient period, as evidenced by production of large numbers of copper, bronze and iron swords and other weapons made of same materials, and which subsisted in Iran through the classical period (iron and steel weapons), and culminated in the production of the magnificent crucible steel during medieval and modern periods despite all of the historical changes that Iran underwent at a political level. Accordingly, research into the martial arts of Iran has, until now, demanded an intimate familiarity with a vast range of diverse materials that deal with the subject either directly or indirectly, including direct access to rare manuscripts, manuals, arms and armor that can only be found in Iranian museums itself. With this book, that situation has now changed. The present book deals with the revival of Persian swordsmanship and the traditional martial arts of Iran. Within these pages there are no unprovenanced claims to knowledge. Everything is meticulously referenced. The Iranian martial arts do not depend solely on an “oral tradition” for their lineage as well as their transmission from teacher to student, although the actual instruction is imparted from teacher to student. Rather, with regard to the lineage, every technique, every tactical advice and every method of training and application presented herein is properly provenanced with reference to at least one historical documentary source. Documentary evidence of specific techniques and training methods, taken from primary sources, fully supports every photographic and textual presentation of such techniques and methods shown in a vast number of miniatures and paintings and presented in this book. Didactic literary descriptions of martial arts, which might be likened to combat manuals, have a long history in Iran, and this book continues that tradition and showcases a number of complete and annotated manuascripts on archery, spear and lance fighting, war wrestling, etc. The Iranian martial arts presented in this book therefore hold up to a standard of academic scrutiny that will serve as a basis both for their introduction to the enthusiast or novice as well as a highly credible reference source to researchers.
The book Persian Archery and Swordsmanship: Historical Martial Arts of Iran presents in clearly tabulated descriptions, accompanied by photographic depictions as well as depictions in antique miniature illustrations, combat techniques both on horseback and on foot, and both armed with traditional Iranian weapons and unarmed. The first chapter of this book, "code of chivalry and warrior codex" deals with the warrior codex and the principles of Persian chivalry. This chapter also analyzes the training methods of the varzeš-e pahlavāni (champion sport). This traditional martial art still harbors many legacies from the training of ancient Iranian champions by, for example, using many tools that resemble historical battlefield weapons. The function of these weapons was certainly to train and prepare warriors for the upcoming battles. The next chapter deals with the history, principles and techniques of archery in Iran based on different Persian manuscripts. The next part of the chapter deals with principles of archery as described in different Persian manuscripts such as the archery part in the book Nŏruznāme [The Book of Nŏruz] attributed to Omar ben Ebrāhim Xayyām-e Neyšāburi, a complete, translated and annotated translation of a Safavid period manuscript written by Šarif Mohammad the son of Ahmad Mehdi Hosseyni on archery, lance fighting, wrestling, spear fighting and sword sharpening and etching. The next archery manual presented in this book is Jāme al-Hadāyat fi Elm al-Romāyat [Complete Guide about the Science of Archery] by Nezāmeldin Ahmad ben Mohammad ben Ahmad Šojāeldin Dorudbāši Beyhaqi from the Safavid period. Another archery manuscript offered in the book is titled Resāle-ye Kamāndāri [Archery Manuscript]. The third chapter of the book discusses "mounted combat and horse classification in Persian manuscripts".The chapter deals with the these topics presenting a number of Persian manuscripts in this respect. The next chapter deals with combat with spears and lances in Iranian history. The chapter describes spears and lances and their typologies and then expands on different attack techniques with a lance/spear such as attacking different parts of the body with a spear/lance such as the eye, the neck, the throat, the mouth, the face, the arm/forearm, the chest, the abdomen, the navel, the shoulder, the side of the body, the back, the groin, the legs, the lower part of the spear/lance and cutting the armor straps of the opponent and many other techniques. The next chapter discusses the techniques of swordsmanship based on a number of Persian manuscripts. Analyzing different Persian manuscripts such as epic tales and battle accounts, one notes a certain consistency in the recurrent allusion to certain techniques through the centuries. The next chapter analyzes the history of maces and axes in Iranian martial tradition.Similar to swords, the techniques of using axes and maces from various sources are analyzed and presented starting from epics from the tenth century C.E. up until relevant sources dating back to the end of the Qājār period. Another chapter provides information on combat with short edged weapons in Iran such as kārd (knife), xanjar (dagger) and pišqabz (S-shaped dagger). The following chapter informs about combat with Persian short swords named qame and qaddāre in Iranian history. Those who are interested in wrestling will find this book indispensable as a reference source, as wrestling, of various types, has an extremely long history in Iran and is perhaps the most important foundation in the training of the Persian warrior archetype. Wrestling is highly systematized and there are prescribed criteria for graduation through various ranks of a wrestling school as well as detailed descriptions of wrestling techniques and sets of counters to every wrestling technique. Wrestling itself is also the basis of many techniques that are to be executed when armed with traditional weapons both long and short, as one of the most important objectives in Iranian martial arts is to take the opponent to the ground to finish him off (often with a dagger), and another is to use wrestling techniques in conjunction with a sword, or with a sword and shield in preparation to administer a finishing stroke. The wrestling chapter deals with wrestling which was an integral part of combat in Iran and includes the following sections: wrestling in Iranian history, techniques of wrestling on the battlefield (dealing with grabbing the sword hand or weapon hand of the opponent and throwing the opponent and using wrestling techniques on the battlefield).The chapter also offers the complete translated and annotated wrestling manuscripts. One of them is a wrestling manuscript written by Šarif Mohammad the son of Ahmad Mehdi Hosseyni from the period of Šāh Esmā'il Safavid. The chapter also offers a complete translated and annotated manuscript of the Tumār-e Puryā-ye Vali (Scroll of Puryā-ye Vali). The Safavid-period manuscript offers the names of many wrestling techniques. The chapter also presents a complete translated and annotated version of the Qājār-period poem Masnavi-ye Golkošti-ye Mirnejāt that deals with the topic of wrestling. The poem mentions a wide array of wrestling techniques.
The book Persian Archery and Swordsmanship: Historical Martial Arts of Iran also offers a fully colored catalog of a number of historical Persian arms and armor at the end of the book with detailed descriptions and measurements. Additionally the book has many miniatures depicting different war scenes from a number of Persian manuscripts.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. CODE OF CHIVALRY AND WARRIOR CODEX
1.1 Warrior behavior, ceremony and respect
1.2 The principles of javānmardi and ayyārān
1.3 Preparation and training of warriors
1.4 Physical exercises and training tools in the zurxāne
1.5 Conclusion

2. THE SACRED WEAPON: ARCHERY IN IRAN
2.1 Archery in Iranian history
2.2 Composite bow
2.3 Bow and its typologies
2.4 Arrow
2.5 Thumb protector
2.6 Bowstring
2.7 The quiver and the bow case
2.8 Arrow guide
2.9 Principles of archery
2.10 Target areas for archery
2.11 Persian manuscripts on archery
2.12 Conclusion

3. MOUNTED COMBAT AND HORSE CLASSIFICATION IN PERSIAN MANUSCRIPTS
3.1 Fighting with the lance on horseback
3.2 Fighting with the mace and axe on horseback
3.3 Sword drawing and swordfighting on horseback
3.4 Grabbing, grappling and wrestling techniques on horseback
3.5 Techniques and weapons for attacking a horse or an elephant
3.6 A manuscript on lance combat by Šarif Mohammad the son of Ahmad
Mehdi Hosseyni from the period of Šāh Esmā'il Safavid.
3.7 Using lasso on horseback
3.8 Horse classification in Persian manuscripts

4. COMBAT WITH SPEARS AND LANCES IN IRANIAN HISTORY
4.1 Spears and lances in Iranian history
4.2 Spear/lance and its typologies
4.3 Attack techniques with a lance/spear
4.4 Feinting techniques with a lance/spear
4.5 Defense techniques with a spear/lance
4.6 Combinations of lance/spear techniques
4.7 A manuscript on spear combat by Šarif Mohammad the son of Ahmad
Mehdi Hosseyni from the period of Šāh Esmā'il Safavid
4.8 Spear in combination with the shield
4.9 Conclusion

5. SWORDSMANSHIP
5.1 Carrying, sheathing, and unsheathing the sword
5.2 Carrying the shield
5.3 Attacking techniques
5.4 Feinting Techniques
5.5 Combinations
5.6 Defensive techniques
5.7 Possible combinations of the attack and defense techniques with a šamšir
(sword) and a separ (shield) in Persian swordsmanship
5.8 A manuscript on swords by Šarif Mohammad the son of Ahmad Mehdi
Hosseyni from the period of Šāh Esmā'il Safavid (1502-1524 C.E.)
5.9 Conclusion

6. MACES AND AXES IN IRANIAN MARTIAL TRADITION
6.1 Maces in Iranian history
6.2 Mace and its typologies
6.3 Weight and impact force of the mace
6.4 Carrying the mace
6.5 Techniques of mace attacks
6.6 Defensive techniques with a mace
6.7 Combinations of fighting techniques with the mace
6.8 General aspects about the axe
6.9 Techniques of attack with an axe
6.10 Combinations with an axe
6.11 Conclusion

7. COMBAT WITH SHORT EDGED WEAPONS IN IRAN
7.1 Definition of kārd (knife)
7.2 Kārd in Persian manuscripts
7.3 Carrying and unsheathing a knife
7.4 Techniques of attack using a knife
7.5 Combination of techniques in fighting with a knife
7.6 Definition of xanjar
7.7 Xanjar in Persian manuscripts
7.8 Carrying and unsheathing the dagger
7.9 Techniques of attack with a dagger
7.10 Combinations of fighting techniques with the dagger
7.11 Definition of pišqabz
7.12 Conclusion

8. THE COMBAT WITH SHORT SWORDS: QAME AND QADDĀRE
8.1 Attack techniques with a qaddāre
8.2 Possible combinations with a qaddāre
8.3 Attack techniques with a qame

9. WRESTLING: AN INTEGRAL PART OF COMBAT IN IRAN
9.1 Wrestling in Iranian history
9.2 Techniques of wrestling on the battlefield
9.3 Wrestling manuscript by Šarif Mohammad the son of Ahmad Mehdi
Hosseyni from the period of Šāh Esmā'il Safavid
9.4 A comparative analysis of the techniques mentioned in the Safavid period
wrestling manuscript
9.5 The manuscript of the Tumār-e Puryā-ye Vali (Scroll of Puryā-ye Vali)
9.6 A comparative analysis of the techniques mentioned in the manuscript
Tumār-e Puryā-ye Vali
9.7 The manuscript Masnavi-ye Golkošti-ye Mirnejāt
9.8 A comparative analysis of the techniques mentioned in the Mirnejāt
manuscript
9.9 Conclusion
10. References
12. Catalog
Wenn ich groß bin, will ich ne richtige Werkstatt.

Benutzeravatar
Yayci
Hero Member
Hero Member
Beiträge: 532
Registriert: 02.01.2012, 12:56

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Yayci » 16.12.2012, 01:12

Ui, klingt interessant. Vielen Dank für den Hinweis! Gerade der Hinweis auf das Zurkhane (so eine Art ritualisiertes traditionel iranisches Fitnesstudio, um's salop zu formulieren, maazerat mikonam falls ein Iraner hier mitliest) ist interessant. Das ist nämlich eine der wenigen "kriegerischen" Traditionen aus dem alten Iran, die überlebt haben. Wie es heute in Iran mit dem BOgenschießen aussieht, wäre mal sehr interessant zu wissen.

Sowie mein "Spinnerei-Budget" es hergibt...
Gute Nacht,
Philipp
"Bogenschießen ist eine schwere Aufgabe, wer es betreibt, weiß es. - Okçuluk bir belâdir, onu çeken bilir." (Türkisches Sprichwort)

Benutzeravatar
Sjaunja
Full Member
Full Member
Beiträge: 119
Registriert: 15.04.2010, 20:54

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Sjaunja » 16.12.2012, 11:30

Gab's vor einiger Zeit etwas auf atarn

http://atarn.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=2091

Mvh,
Sjaunja

Benutzeravatar
Arry
Hero Member
Hero Member
Beiträge: 1353
Registriert: 15.04.2012, 21:26

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Arry » 16.12.2012, 14:11

Yayci hat geschrieben: Sowie mein "Spinnerei-Budget" es hergibt...

Hehe, sehr schön. So ein Budget braucht man!
Wenn ich groß bin, will ich ne richtige Werkstatt.

Benutzeravatar
Arry
Hero Member
Hero Member
Beiträge: 1353
Registriert: 15.04.2012, 21:26

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Arry » 09.04.2013, 07:27

Ich hatte am Wochenende Gelegenheit, kurz durch das Buch zu blättern. Die Archery-Sektion besteht aus einer Einführung in die persischen Begrifflichkeiten, die mit Bildchen aus Miniaturen einigermaßen anschaulich gemacht werden. Anschließend werden ins Englische übersetzte persische Manuskripte präsentiert, die u.a. auch auf Schießtechnik eingehen. Ein Beispiel, das bei mir hängen geblieben ist, war die Empfehlung in einem dieser Texte, den Riegel erst drei Finger tief unter dem genockten Pfeil zu bilden und ihn dann auf der Sehne nach oben an die korrekte Stelle zu schieben.
Hatte das Buch wirklich nur drei Minuten in der Hand - würde von diesem kurzen Eindruck aber bezweifeln, ob sich die Anschaffung für diejenigen lohnt, die sich nur für das Bogenschießen interessieren. Die eigene Leistung des Autors liegt m.E. in der Übersetzung der Manuskripte.
Wenn ich groß bin, will ich ne richtige Werkstatt.

Benutzeravatar
benzi
Forenlegende
Forenlegende
Beiträge: 6487
Registriert: 31.10.2009, 19:19

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von benzi » 09.04.2013, 10:06

Arry hat geschrieben: Ein Beispiel, das bei mir hängen geblieben ist, war die Empfehlung in einem dieser Texte, den Riegel erst drei Finger tief unter dem genockten Pfeil zu bilden und ihn dann auf der Sehne nach oben an die korrekte Stelle zu schieben.
...


das empfiehlt schon Stephen Selby in seinem Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKY9qILBrH4

bei min 2:50 min und auch mit Hintergrund, es verhindert das Einklemmen der Haut

Grüße benzi
"Du hast den Verstand verloren, weißt Du das?" "Dafür hab ich ein Leben lang üben müssen"
(Peaceful Warrior, Film)

Sateless
Forenlegende
Forenlegende
Beiträge: 4077
Registriert: 02.01.2010, 19:11

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Sateless » 09.04.2013, 10:13

wo ist der zusammenhang? für mich sind das zwei unterschiedliche techiken.
Zuletzt geändert von Sateless am 09.04.2013, 13:23, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.
Ich schreibe ohne Autokorrektur lesenswerter. Du etwa auch?
.مع سلامة في أمان السهم و القوس

Benutzeravatar
Faenwulf
Sr. Member
Sr. Member
Beiträge: 403
Registriert: 12.11.2012, 11:33

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Faenwulf » 09.04.2013, 13:13

Wenn man sich auf Grund eines zu weit oben angesetzten Locks der Zughand die Haut einklemmt ist es egal ob man Osmansich, Arabisch, Mongolisch, Koreanisch, Chinesisch oder Timbuktuische Daumentechnik verwendet. Ganz simpel. ;)

Sateless
Forenlegende
Forenlegende
Beiträge: 4077
Registriert: 02.01.2010, 19:11

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Sateless » 09.04.2013, 13:29

Wenn ich Arry/Khorasani richtig verstehe verriegelt er in hochrunter Richtung an der Sehne tiefer, also weiter Richtung Fußboden, und schieb den fertigen Riegel dann hoch.
Selby schiebt den Spannring am Finger etwas nach Oben, richtung Körpermitte.
Das ist halt was anderes, und unabhängig davon, aus welchem Kulturkreis eine Technik kommt.
Was mich an Benzis Beitrag irritierte, ist, genau das, wo du jetzt reintappst, Faenwulf, das sind zwei unterschiedliche Bewegungen, mit selbem Sinn, die nach Benzis Beitrag so rüberkommen, als wären es die gleichen Bewegungen.
Und da die beschriebene Technik, eine andere ist und aus einem anderen Kulturkreis kommt, sehe ich keinen Zusammenhang. "Ganz simpel. ;) "
Ich schreibe ohne Autokorrektur lesenswerter. Du etwa auch?
.مع سلامة في أمان السهم و القوس

Benutzeravatar
Faenwulf
Sr. Member
Sr. Member
Beiträge: 403
Registriert: 12.11.2012, 11:33

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Faenwulf » 09.04.2013, 14:05

Natürlich differenziert beides wohl im Detail - so habe ich Arrys Beschreibung durchaus auch verstanden.
Aber der Sinn ist der Selbe. Daher hat Benzi das Video hier verlinkt.

Sateless
Forenlegende
Forenlegende
Beiträge: 4077
Registriert: 02.01.2010, 19:11

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Sateless » 08.12.2013, 23:09

Also, ich hab den Schinken. Es ist ein richtig gutes Buch. Wenn man sich nur für das Bogenschießen interessiert, kommt man mit dem Vorwort von Bede Dwyer (eineinhalb Seiten), und dem Bogenschießteil (40 Seiten) + Fußnoten etwa ein Neuntel des ganzen Buches zum genießen. In den 40 Seiten gibt es 12 Seiten Einleitung (mit viel zu kleinen Bildern von den persischen Originalbögen ;) ), drei Bogenschießhandbücher in englische Sprache übersetzt, aus dem 11.Jhd, von 1612-1613 und eins ohne - oder mit von mir überlesener- Datierung, deren Namen ich nicht abtippe, weil ich sonst wieder geralpht werde. Diese drei Manuskripte sind in sehr geschliffenem und störrischem Englisch, also wahrscheinlich sehr nah am Original. Es liest sich grausam, aber ich mag das. Bei nem 130 Kröten Buch leg ich sowieso jedes Wort auf die Goldwage, ob das nun flüssig zu lesen ist, oder nicht. Daher hatte ich ein gutes Gefühl, dass hier die Wörter gut gewählt waren.
Fazit, viel Geld ... für ein Buch, dass sich eigentlich auf die Gesammtheit der Kriegskünste des Iran konzentriert. Als reines Bogenhandbuch absolut nicht zu empfehlen, da kommt man mit dem Swoboda oder Saracen-Archery weiter. Wenn man sich speziell für persisches Bogenschießen erwärmen kann, geduldig beim Lesen ist, und auch den eigentlichen Hauptteil, den Nahkampf mal interessant findet, ist das eine gute Wahl als Ergänzug zu weiterer Bogenliteratur. Yayci wirds vermutlich lieben :D
Dass Papierqualität, Bund und Druck absolut stimmig sind, will ich auch nicht unerwähnt lassen.

Ja es ist sein Geld wert, leider erst ab einem leicht gesteigerten Interesse für das Gesammtthema des Buches.
Ich schreibe ohne Autokorrektur lesenswerter. Du etwa auch?
.مع سلامة في أمان السهم و القوس

Taran
Forenlegende
Forenlegende
Beiträge: 4385
Registriert: 06.08.2003, 23:46

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Taran » 09.12.2013, 00:44

Ich empfehl das mal meinem persischstämmigen Kollegen - vielleicht krieg ich ihn so zum Bogenschießen!

Sateless
Forenlegende
Forenlegende
Beiträge: 4077
Registriert: 02.01.2010, 19:11

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Sateless » 09.12.2013, 10:10

Phew, ich denke nicht, dass diese Handbücher dazu geeignet sind, daraus Bogenschießen zu lernen. Ich wünsche dir trotzdem viel Erfolg dabei! :)
Ich schreibe ohne Autokorrektur lesenswerter. Du etwa auch?
.مع سلامة في أمان السهم و القوس

Benutzeravatar
Arry
Hero Member
Hero Member
Beiträge: 1353
Registriert: 15.04.2012, 21:26

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Arry » 09.12.2013, 10:13

Dankeschön für die Kritik, Simon! Schön, dass Du daran gedacht hast.
Wenn ich groß bin, will ich ne richtige Werkstatt.

Sateless
Forenlegende
Forenlegende
Beiträge: 4077
Registriert: 02.01.2010, 19:11

Re: M.Khorasani: Persian Archery and Swordsmanship

Beitrag von Sateless » 30.12.2013, 18:45

Ich schreibe ohne Autokorrektur lesenswerter. Du etwa auch?
.مع سلامة في أمان السهم و القوس

Antworten